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The Maze and the Labyrinth

The Maze

The maze has its origins in the Renaissance. The maze in the Gärten der Welt is modelled on the example in the garden of the British Royal Castle at Hampton Court, which is considered one of the oldest in Europe and has remained largely unchanged over the centuries. The maze in the Gärten der Welt is made up of 1,225 evergreen yew trees which are regularly pruned. At approximately two metres high, the hedges deny even the tallest people an advantage. But once at its centre, whose entrance is flanked by two massive granite boulders, you can get an overview of the precise geometry of the 2,000 square metre maze thanks to a lookout tower. Once you’re finished looking, all you have to do is find your way out again.

 

The Labyrinth

Numerous myths are entwined with labyrinths. For example, the story of Theseus, who had to cross a labyrinth to defeat the Minotaur. With the help of the red thread of the Princess Ariadne, he was able to find his way out again from the labyrinth after the deed had been done. In the labyrinth of Gärten der Welt, light grey stones mark the way to the centre and back out again. After 11 passes, 28 turns and about 10 minutes you’ve reached the centre of the labyrinth.

 

Other Themed Gardens

Jewish Garden

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The Maze and the Labyrinth

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Christian Garden

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Oriental Garden

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Japanese Garden

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Korean Garden

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Karl Foerster Perennial Garden

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Italian Renaissance Garden

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Balinese Garden

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English Garden

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